Renewable Fuels Technology

Associate of Science Degree

2012-2013 academic year

You can earn an associate of science degree with an concentration in renewable fuels technology. Note that not all courses for each program can be offered every semester.

You will need to successfully complete a minimum of 60 Credit Hours.


Recommended Core Courses

Core

Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
AGRI 1030 Introduction to Soil Science
The development, physics, chemistry, biology, and classification of soils with emphasis on the role of soils in the growth of plants.
3
AGRI 1040 Introduction to Soil Science Lab
Lab for AGRI 1030, including soil samples, texture, soil surveys, nutrient deficiency, lime recommendations, cation exchange capacity, texture triangle, and acre furrow slice.
1
AGRI 1120 Food-Agriculture-Natural Resources Systems
Exploration of careers in the agribusiness industry. Covers the various products available for agricultural use and the companies manufacturing these products. Includes numerous field trips to agricultural industries and visits with manufacturers' representatives as outside resources.
3
CHEM 1140 General Chemistry I
Study of general principles including atomic structure, nomenclature, reactions, and compounds.
5
AGRI 1410 Introduction to the Economics of Agriculture
Introductory course to help students develop a basic understanding and appreciation for the role of economics in agriculture at the farm, national, and international levels. Students will learn to apply various economic principles and concepts relating to production agriculture, business management, consumer behavior, market price analysis and equilibrium, and policy information.
3
AGRI 1420 Interpersonal Skills
Designed to help students understand positive interpersonal relationships and their contribution to the process of potentiality development.
3

Required General Education Courses

English / Literature 3 Credit Hours

select one must earn a C or above
Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
THEA 1010 Introduction to Theatre
An introduction to the forms and functions of the dramatic arts within a historical perspective. Includes an introduction to basic theatre skills as well as an introduction to a range of dramatic literature.
3
ENGL 2100 Introduction to Literature
This course introduces students to the major genres and conventions associated with literature. It includes fiction, poetry, drama and memoir. By employing critical reading and thinking skills and analytical and creative writing skills, students will understand literature more fully. The course exposes students to a range of authors representing a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds.
3
ENGL 2140 Introduction to Shakespeare
Focus is on an examination of the plays by William Shakespeare and the history that influenced the major themes of his canon. Students will study several of his plays from the three major divisions of his work as a playwright: the tragedies, history plays, and the comedies.
3
THEA 2140 Introduction to Shakespeare
Focus is on an examination of the plays by William Shakespeare and the history that influenced the major themes of his canon. Students will study several of his plays from the three major divisions of his work as a playwright: the tragedies, history plays, and the comedies.
3
ENGL 2150 Survey of American Literature I
Critical reading and evaluation of writers of prose and poetry from the colonial period to 1865. Emphasizes such writers as Edwards, Hawthorne, Melville, Longfellow, Emerson, Thoreau, and Native American writing.
3
ENGL 2160 Survey of American Literature II
Covers American writers from 1865 to the present, such as Whitman, Twain, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Eliot.
3
ENGL 2200 Survey of English Literature I
Study and comprehensive reading in English literature from 700-1800 following its development from Beowulf to the Romantic period with emphasis on poetry and essay forms.
3
ENGL 2210 Survey of English Literature II
Study and comprehensive reading in English literature from the Romantic movement to the present day, including poetry and the essay with works by representative novelists.
3

Fine and Performing Arts 3 Credit Hours

Must have 9 credit hours divided among Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences with at least one course from English/Literature and one course from Social and Behavioral Science.
Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
MUSC 1550 Music in Western Culture
Study of the development of music and how it relates to the events of our past and present. All types of music included. Open registration.
3
ARTS 2000 Art History-Ancient to Gothic
A survey of major works of art in all media from Prehistory through the end of the Late Gothic. Artistic styles will be discussed in relation to contemporary history, society, and culture. Individual works of art will be explored as well as the role of art and architecture in a cultural context.
3
ARTS 2010 Art History-Renaissance to Present
A survey of major works of art in all media from the Renaissance through Post Modernism. Artistic styles will be discussed in relation to contemporary history, society, and culture. Individual works of art will be explored as well as the role of art and architecture in a cultural context.
3
THEA 2140 Introduction to Shakespeare
Focus is on an examination of the plays by William Shakespeare and the history that influenced the major themes of his canon. Students will study several of his plays from the three major divisions of his work as a playwright: the tragedies, history plays, and the comedies.
3

Mathematics 3-10 Credit Hours

select at least three credit hours at the 2000 level or above
Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
MATH 1200 Algebra and Trigonometry
Study of field axioms, sets, functions, equations, inequalities, matrices and determinants, exponents, logarithms, trigonometric functions and analysis.
5
MATH 2000 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
This course is a study of analytical geometry and single variable calculus. Topics includes limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives, integrals, and applications of integrals.
5
MATH 2010 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
Covers differentiation and integration of inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. It also looks at techniques of integration, infinite series, select topics from analytic geometry, and polar coordinates.
5
MATH 2020 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III
Covers multivariate and vector calculus, with an introduction to differential equations.
5
MATH 2030 Introduction to Statistics
Study of algebraic sets, finite probability spaces, counting techniques, random variables, and binomial distribution.
3

Natural Science 8-15 Credit Hours

select two from list or from any other higher level course of Natural Science
Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
BIOS 1010 General Biology
Introduction to the major biological concepts: ecosystem dynamics, cell structure and function, cell division, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and genetics, as well as a variety of laboratory techniques.
4
PHYS 1130 Introductory Physics I
Study of principles and their application in mechanics, heat, and sound.
5

Oral Communication 3 Credit Hours

must earn C or above
Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
SPCH 1110 Public Speaking
This course will assist the student to master the skills required of speaking in today's workplace. It will focus on the organization, preparation, research, and evidence needed for a presentation that is tailored to fit the audience. The course will enhance the student's listening skills which will assist them in everyday situations.
3

Social & Behavioral Sciences 3-6 Credit Hours

select at least one
Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
SOCI 1010 Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to the basic principles of sociology including the study of culture, socialization, social structure, social institutions, investigative behavior, deviance, inequalities including race, ethnicity, stratification; demography, population, and theoretical perspectives.
3
HIST 1030 European Civilization I
Study of history that interprets and evaluates the contribution of civilizations from ancient times to 1600.
3
HIST 1040 European Civilization II
The development of European civilization since 1600, concluding with the peace settlements and national tensions that followed World War II.
3
PSYC 1810 Introduction to Psychology
An introduction to the science of psychology including the application of critical thinking to the study of learning theory, memory, personality, growth and development, neurological aspects, abnormal behavior, therapies, intelligence, motivation, emotion, sensation, perceptions and theoretical perspectives.
3
HIST 2010 American History I
A survey of American history from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War or Reconstruction. Emphasis is on the political, economic, cultural, and social issues in the development of the American nation.
3
HIST 2020 American History II
A survey of American history from the end of the Civil War to the present. Emphasis is on the political, economic, cultural, and social issues that arise in America’s development as a global power.
3
ECON 2110 Principles of Macroeconomics
Introduction to the nature and concepts of economics. Topics include economic systems, measurement and analysis of aggregate variables such as national income, expenditures, fiscal and monetary policy, employment, and inflation. Other policies for macroeconomic stabilization and growth are evaluated.
3

Technology 2-3 Credit Hours

Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
AGRI 1000 Microcomputer Applications
An introductory course covering the Windows environment, file management, word processing software, the Internet and their application to actual agricultural business situations. Students learn how to use common word processing software tools, computer file management, and the world wide web.
2

Written Communication 3 Credit Hours

ENGL 1010 required - must earn C or above
Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
ENGL 1010 English Composition I
Designed to develop writing skills. Students write papers and essays which emphasize the importance of clarity, idea development, focus, organization, word choice, logic and sentence construction. The process of planning, writing, revising, and editing essays for a particular audience and basic research-related skills are also emphasized.
3

Suggested Elective Courses

Electives 23 Credit Hours

Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
BIOS 2030 Microbiology
Lecture and laboratory studies on morphology, physiology, distribution and economic importance of various microorganisms. Lab activities include sterile technique, staining, pure cultures, metabolism, identification and other basic micro lab techniques.
4
MATH 2030 Introduction to Statistics
Study of algebraic sets, finite probability spaces, counting techniques, random variables, and binomial distribution.
3
RNEW 1165 Instrumentation and Control Lab
This laboratory will provide application of what is learned in the Instrumentation and Control Theory course through the use of process control trainers.
1
RNEW 1110 Mechanical and Fluid Fundamentals
This course presents a basic understanding of fluid fundamentals with emphasis on electronic and pneumatic control systems. Identification of pumps, valves, heat exchangers, cooling towers, compressors, refrigeration principles, and boiler systems will be presented. Start-up, shutdown, operation, and troubleshooting for each of these mechanical systems will be studied at an introductory level.
3
RNEW 1300 Cooperative Internship I
Work-study program for in-depth instruction on the job. The college gives both related and vocational instruction before and-or during this period, including seminars, directly related to work experience. These experiences are supervised by the college and employers so that each contributes to the student's education and employability. Minimum 2.0 GPA after completing freshman year of program required.
8
RNEW 1101 Ethanol Process Fundamentals
Covers in detail the overall fundamental process of ethanol production. A Process Flow Diagram of a typical ethanol plant will be used to examine the sequence of operation, including residence times, pressures, and temperatures seen in various stages of production. The course will explain the rationale for feedstock and additives used in ethanol processing as well as product and co-product production and use.
2
RNEW 1125 Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams
This course will cover the symbols and diagrams commonly used on piping and instrumentation diagrams, or P and IDs, and electrical one-line diagrams. Focus will be on identifying the types of diagrams, identifying instrument symbols and line symbols used on P and IDs, understanding the types of information typically found on a legend, using a P and ID to locate the components of a system, identification of symbols used on electrical one-line diagrams, and reading a flow diagram to trace the flow paths of a system.
0.5
RNEW 1100 Process Dynamics
An introduction to the basic principles of industrial physics that are frequently encountered in an operating plant environment. Principles of flow, temperature, pressure, heat, gases, liquids, solids, fluid systems, process dynamics, and heat transfer are covered.
3
RNEW 1140 Process Plant Chemistry
This course is designed to overview the relationship of science, technology, and management areas in regards to agricultural processing plant operations. The course has a strong emphasis on the product, operational, and business aspects of agricultural processing plants.
2
RNEW 1160 Instrumentation and Control
This course will provide a study of the fundamental concepts of programmable logic controls: hardware identification and application, and system testing. The course will also cover the calibration and troubleshooting of equipment used to measure flow rate, pressure, temperature, and pH.
3

Suggested Elective Courses

See advisor and confirm with transfer institution for recommended electives.


Take this classNote to Current Students

We strongly recommend that you review your course schedule with your advisor and consult the college catalog for specific program requirements.